When cpasized the Vortex  can be righted like any other dinghy; but in strong winds there is a tendency for the boat to flip over into another capsize when you pull the boat upright.  This can turn into a strenuos excercise worthy of some cursing and swearing. But if you do it right you will only need to do it once. The video shows how to do it. but let me emphasize the need to free off the mainsheet and kicker Completely. this is the link showing a capsize and recovery in 23mph (gusting 38 mph wind) :-      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQTk4VAoASw&feature=youtu.be  

Use your spinaker sheet looped around its block as a righting line.  Stand on the lower foil and lean back holding the spinaker sheet. Put one foot on the front hull and try to put your weight onto that leg. You will notice that the hull does turn slightly into the wind. As the mast and sail break the water the wind will get underneath the sail and lift it. when this happens lean forward and grab the front handle with both hands pushing the boat into the wind and pulling the boat down on top of you. Don't worry it won't hit your head, but your weight on the frornt of the boat allows the stern to lift out of the water and swing around to leward. The boat will now be head to wind and you can climb out onto the front deck between the two hulls. This is the safest place to be in strong wind as the boat will sit there quite happily and not turn away from the wind.  You can now stuff the spinaker back into its sock if need be. Move back into the cockpit and you are ready to sail away.

 

If  clicking on the link does not open the you tube video, try highlighting the link , then right click  and select open link.   Alternatively paste the URL into a new browser window.

 

 

 

Report on Vortex National Championship 2018 

 

  14th & 15th July 2018  

 

At Yorkshire Dales S C

The weather was perfect, a force 2-3, from the west and hot and sunny. The visitors from Scotland and London joined the local fleets to give 10 boats on the start line.

Jonathan Lister dominated race 1 from start to finish, Phil Whitehead leading the rest of the fleet until the last lap when he succumbed to cramp letting Angus Winchester and Neil Spink through.

John Turley and Jonathan Lister had a significant lead at the first windward mark of race 2 only to "slip on a snake" as a big gust from behind pushed the rest of the fleet over them on the downwind leg. Phil Whitehead, Neil Spink and Jonathan Carter pulled away and led for most of the race until JL found a useful last downwind "ladder" with extra pressure on the left, which hadn't paid before, just squeezing ahead at the last mark. 

 

Jonathan Carter led from the start of race 3 with Phil Whitehead and Mick Collins in contention and the rest of the fleet some distance behind. Jonathan Lister slowly recovered from a shocking start and spinnaker halyard tangle but again left it until the last downwind leg and another left hand side "ladder" to sneak in front of JC, with Mick Collins just pipping Phil.

Overnight JL had a comfortable lead with three bullets but there were three boats in equal second place with all to play for tomorrow.

The fleet joined the Blaze sailors for an Indian takeaway, enjoying a beer in the hot tub overlooking the magnificent scenery of Yorkshire dales.


Enjoying a beer in the hot tub at Yorkshire Dales SC after the Vortex National Championships - photo © Phillip Whitehead

Neil Spink. won the start and together with Jonathan Carter they dominated race 4, enjoying a wind shift that made the course a follow-the-leader with limited tactical opportunities for catching up until the last lap when the wind swung back giving JL the chance to close the gap on the leaders. Neil held his lead for a well deserved win but JC just lost out to JL in a tacking battle to the line. The Scottish contingent and clubmates Angus Winchester and Steve Cochrane battled it out for fourth and fifth. Phil had bad luck with a broken halyard so had to sit this one out.

Jonathan Lister and Neil Spink made the early running in stronger wind for race 5, this time it was Mick Collins on a last lap charge - he passed Neil who was having spinnaker dropping issues but couldn't quite catch JL before the finish.

The wind swung left and picked up another notch for the last race. Phil stormed off the line with Neil Spink in hot pursuit. Whilst JL didn't need to sail the last race it was such a lovely day it would have been a crime not to; he made yet another shocking start, late and at the wrong end of the line, flipped onto port picked up a nice lift and judged the layline to the new windward mark to perfection, taking the lead as half the fleet overstood going to the wrong mark.

The battle for the minor places played out behind with Neil cementing second, Phil third, whilst JC was struggling for power in the stronger wind with a broken spreader.

A very enjoyable weekend, with a deserved winner showing unattainable speed (must be all that skiff sailing!). A big thanks to Terry Pressdee and crew for good race management and of course the legendary galley food and facilities. Next venue is Rutland for the Inland Championships on 22-23 September.   See Results Below

Pos

Helm

Sail No

Club

R1

R2

R3

R4

R5

R6

Pts

1

Jonathan Lister

1164

YDSC

1

1

1

 2

1

1

5

2

Neil Spink

1048

YDSC

3

3

 6

1

3

2

12

3

Phil Whitehead

1218

YDSC

4

2

4

(DNF)

4

3

17

4

Jonathan Carter

2014

Rickmansworth SC

 8

4

2

3

5

5

19

5

Angus Winchester

1181

Castle Semple SC

2

 6

5

4

6

4

21

6

Mick Collins

1117

YDSC

5

5

3

7

2

 10

22

7

John Turley

1160

YDSC

6

7

7

 8

7

7

34

8

Steve Cochgrave

1084

Castle Semple SC

9

8

9

5

 10

6

37

9

Ed Corteen

2016

Pennine SC

7

 9

8

9

9

9

42

10

David Smith

1041

YDSC

(DNC)

DNC

DNC

6

8

8

46

11

William Jones

1219

YDSC

10

10

10

10

(DNC)

DNC

52

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the Vortex website.

 

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Vortex Open  Meetings for 2018

This year we will hold 3 official Vortex open meetings.  These events run over 2 days (Saturday and Sunday)  and we usually aim to do 3 back to back races each day.  If wind conditions are forcast to be very light on the Sunday we may do 4 races on the Saturday  and visa versa if the wind is very light on the Saturday.

The first Open event is  the Scottish National Championship:-  on 19th and 20th May 2018.

Host for this event is Largs Sailing club.:-

Largs Yacht Haven, Irvine Rd, KA30 8EZ Largs

This is the Largs regatta weekend and Musto Skiffs will holding their event on the same course, each class having their own start.

The first race on the Saturday will start around 12:30      The last race on Sunday will finish around 14:30

 

The 2nd evemt will be the English National Championship  on the 14th and 15th of July 2018

Host for this event is Yorkshire Dales Sailing Club

The Clubhouse, Grimwith Reservoir, Hebden Road, BD23 5ED Skipton
 
There will be free camping onsite available from Friday 13th May.This is usualy a well attended event and all will be most to welcome to experience the best facilities and sailing in the north of England.
 
 
 
The 3rd event will be the Southern Championship  on 22nd and 23rd September 2018
 
The host for this event is  
Rutland Sailing CThe lub Ltd Gibbetts Lane, LE15 8HJ Oakham
 
Another great venue for Vortex sailing. 6 races 5 to count, 3 races back to back each day. The sailing area is massive and a good course is guararnteed as the  sailing area is so big. Camping and bunkhouse accomadation is available on site.
Contact  the sailing club office to book the bunkhouse accomadation .

Getting the Sail Up

A Vortex mainsail can be tricky to hoist in a breeze, especially if your boat isn't pointing in the right direction. Here's a couple of tips pulled from the old site's forum:

Make sure the rig tension is loose/light.

Make sure the Gnav is loose/free.  

Do not apply your rig tension until you have hoisted the sail.

Make sure that the boom is parallel to the bottom of the sail...ie if the wind has blown it off to one side, then move the boom around to be under it (or move the boat) As the mast rotates the angle of entry to the groove changes - this makes it all much easier.

I usually unroll the sail and lay it folded on the starboard side of the boat and feed the clew into the track on the end of the boom.

You can then stand on the deck next to the mast (starboard side) and feed the sail into the mast track with one hand while pulling the halyard with the other. When you have fed about a foot of sail into the mast track you can loop the halyard down to your foot and pump the halyard with your foot hoisting the sail up the track. Be careful feeding the batten webbing reinforcement into the track, as it can get caught on the track entry guide. Just apply a little pressure with your thumb to push the webbing into the track guide.

It is also much easier if the boom is not sitting on the deck. To suspend the boom in mid air a short piece of string tied to the eyes in the center of the boom round the bottom of the gnav, holds the boom off the deck if you get the length right.

This means that as the wind veers everything remains lined up. You also don't get that nasty black scratch from the end of the boom as it doesn't touch the hull when you bring the sail down!

Check that your battens are not too tight as over tightening will press the sail hard against the mast track and increase friction making it difficult to hoist the sail. And finally,do make sure you are pointing dead into wind and when it does all go tight feed some of the sail in from the bottom to get past the tight spot.

A squirt of silicon lube up the mast track or on the luff of the sail helps lubricate things whilst you sort out your technique as describe above.

Tacking in a Blow (strong wind)

How to tack a Vortex successfully is one of the first questions new sailors ask after taking the boat out in a blow. The other first question is 'why'?.Here's some tips from Jonathan on how to keep the boat moving through a tack when the wind's up.

Jonathan Lister says:I will probably regret saying this, but I don't have too much trouble tacking, even in a blow.

I think there are a couple of important factors.The first is getting through head to wind properly, the second is sailing off on the new tack without screwing up into wind.

My technique for the first part is to keep the power on all the time. Don't even think about easing the mainsheet. Just before the tack I throw the mainsheet away, landing in a coil just behind the jammer. Of course, this is the moment that you get a lift, so you wait for a while.. then, when you have picked the moment to tack, EASE the tiller down - too much steering will kill boat speed. As the rig starts to de-power come in off the wire, landing close to the main jammer.The next bit is crucial in a blow but can be ommitted in light / medium stuff. Uncleat the main and ease it out a couple of feet.

To ensure that you power out of the tack make sure that you bear away onto a fetch. Hook on the trapeze and as you push out simultaneously sheet in. Only as boat speed builds start to come back close to the wind.

When you have ducked under the boom and got to the other side try to move forward quickly up to the dagger board and avoid putting your weight on the transom end. Weight on the transom slows the boat dramaticly but you can use this to your advantage when you want to slow down, ie approaching a start line too soon.

 

Details of the construction changes made to the new Vortex's.

Here are some words about the changes to the boat that will require class rule changes. These changes have since been approved by the class Association.

The Vortex Class Association members had to fund the construction of new moulds to allow construction of the Vortex to continue and Whites Formula was chosen to construct the new hulls.

New Vortex boats are now available. From MSDS (Mike Saul Dinghy Supplies); the sole supplier and distributor of the new boats.

Whilst they are very similar to those that we have been sailing for the last decade or so, we are not producing different product. The key components of the underwater surfaces and the sails remain unchanged. Where we are making changes it is for one of three reasons:

Because we know that there is a limitation to the current design,

Because the cost of like-for-like components is too high,

Because experience has shown that small modifications will significantly improve the ergonomics of the boat.

In making these changes we have kept in mind the wish of the class to remain a one design and that changes should have small impacts on competitiveness. Below is a list of the changes and an explanation of why the change is being carried out. Some of these changes will require a change in the class rules, but in most cases the modification can be carried out to existing boats if desired.

  1. Redesign of the main bulkhead beneath the mast. This will solve the known problem of the bulkhead working lose over time. It will not be practical to implement this as a retrofit

  2. Enlargement of the internal drainage holes. Again this solves a known problem and cannot be implemented as a retrofit.

  3. The deck will be strengthened to reduce known problems of flexing and insufficient deck strength for components. This will improve the durability of the hulls, but cannot be retrofitted. The areas to be changed are:

  4. a) foredeck area where we stand when rigging

  5. b) area behind dagger board slots for improved location of deck fittings

  6. c) areas along the centre line for better fixing of deck fittings

  7. d) areas where foot straps might be attached.

  8. e) Provision of a stainless steel plate to support bolts for rudder fixings. This will reduce problems in this area, but running aground at speed is still likely to cause damage.

  9. F)The main-sheet turret to be 15mm higher and there will be a separate mounting block for the toe straps. These will improve ergonomics and allow better fixing of the block to the deck.

  10. G) The drainage grill will become an externally mounted component, allowing a stronger join between deck and hull.

  11. H) Insets into the deck as follows: along the sides from the stern to level with the mast to be installed along the edge of the dagger board slots allowing the installation of a friction plate

A grove to accommodate the spinnaker pole

Removal of the current deck handles and installation of a kick bar with inset hand-holds. The kick bar will run from near the stern to just short of the current handle. This will improve the ergonomics of the boat and could be retrofitted.

Move the anchor point for the trapeze from the current position to the location of the current deck handles. This will improve the ergonomics and could be retrofitted.

Improve the ergonomics of the control lines, these modifications could be retrofitted.

The current foredeck assembly for the spinnaker will be redesigned to reduce the cost of production; there will be no change in the functionality.

The mast will be made from Carbon fibre and will become non-rotating and a mast foot track will be installed. The principal reason for doing this is that the cost of producing the goose-neck and spreader assembly would be too high. This will allow us to use a better engineered standard goose-neck solving another known problem. Adding the track will allow us to improve fore-aft balance and may reduce nose diving. Finally it would open the possibility of introducing a self-tacking jib in the future.

With a fixed mast we could also move to using a carbon fibre rather than aluminium at almost the same cost. The trends on costs are such that within a few years carbon will be significantly cheaper than aluminium. This would reduce the weight and reduce the tendency for nose dives.

A redesign of the gnav to improve the ergonomics and reduce wear.

The Boom will be made from Carbon fibre composite

New carbon-composite foils which will reduce the weight of the boat. The new foils will cost more than the current aluminium ones. But we cannot afford the up-front cost of a production run to provide a quantity of the aluminium foils. Whereas the composite foils can be produced in small quantities.

Most of these changes will have minimal or no impact on boat speed, but they will increase boat durability. Boat speed will be improved by the reduction of weight through introducing a new mast, boom and foils. All of which can be retrofitted to current boats. We will need to change the class rules so that both old and new boats are class legal. These changes have been approved and accepted. Initially a lead weight handicap was applied to the new boats in class racing events but this period has now expired and no weight penalty applies to the new boats.